Friday, August 04, 2017

When on the mount the Lord appeared...

File:Giovanni Gerolamo Savoldo 005.jpg
When on the mount the Lord appeared
Transfigured to the sight,
His countenance was like the sun,
His raiment glistened white.

But dull the minds, and dark the eyes,
On whom such glory shone;
They saw not God upon the mount,
They saw but man alone.

And when the dark and cloudy days
Of death and sorrow came,
What were their thoughts of Him who hung
Upon the cross of shame?

They knew not that the God of Life
An offering yielded there,
And of His will endured for all
The load of sin He bare.

Lord, to the mount where Thou art seen
In all Thy glory bright,
Thy servants now would wend their way
To gaze upon the Light,

And there behold, in glory clad,
The Light to mortals given,
That in the night that hid the cross,
Shone with the light of heaven.”
-Hymns from the Morningland: tr. John Brownlie
image

Anglican Unscripted Episode 313


Published on Aug 4, 2017

A.S. Haley: Massive Conflict of Interest Taints South Carolina Ruling

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Yesterday, almost two years after hearing arguments, the Supreme Court of South Carolina finally issued its decision in the case of The Protestant Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, et al. v. The Episcopal Church, et al., as I wrote in this post. Because the Court's collective opinions were some 77 pages long, I was able in the short time after their issuance to present only the broadest overview of the differences that divided the five Justices on the Court.

Today, I plan to examine in depth what I consider to be the overarching problem with the decision: the fact that it glosses over a massive conflict of interest on the part of Justice Kaye Hearn. While she was definitely biased when the case was first appealed to the Court, as I explain in more detail below, that blight on her impartiality pales into insignificance before the blatant, result-oriented bias she has exposed in her opinion concurring in a 3-2 decision that would result in the transfer of multiple millions of dollars' worth of real property from the plaintiff Diocese to the ECUSA-controlled defendant, called the Episcopal Church in South Carolina ("ECSC").

For the basic problem with Justice Hearn's role in this case is as follows. When the case was first appealed in 2015 by the Episcopal Church and the ECSC, Justice Hearn (the newest justice elected to the Court at the time) had been, since at least March 2007, a member of the Episcopal Forum of South Carolina. That was the very organization which, through 14 of its membersbrought disciplinary charges in 2012 against Bishop Mark Lawrence, while he and his Diocese were still members of ECUSA, in an effort to have him deposed by the Disciplinary Board for Bishops. The Disciplinary Board's acceptance of those charges, and its issuance of a "Certification of Abandonment" against Bishop Lawrence, precipitated the withdrawal of his Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina from ECUSA...  the rest
In her concurring opinion, Justice Hearn went out of her way to castigate Bishop Lawrence and the role he played as chief pastor of his Diocese -- ecclesiastical matters which, as her colleagues pointed out, had no business being addressed in a secular judicial opinion. In doing so, she only advanced, and acted as a spokesperson in black robes for, the sectarian interests of the Episcopal Forum to which she still (presumably -- the organization no longer publishes the names of its members) belongs. At the same time, she contradicted her own precept that South Carolina courts should stay out of Episcopal Church matters and defer to its "ecclesiastical determinations."
Canon Phil Ashey: On Lawsuits and Losses
...This is a bad situation. Those who do wrong, and who have a history of doing wrong, appear to have succeeded. What can God’s people do?...

Thursday, August 03, 2017

Peter Jensen: The Mythical Middle

3rd August 2017

It has not worked. It cannot work. It will not work.

I mean the idea that we will be able to find a middle ground, where we will be able to be quietly or relatively conservative, while allowing for a denominational variety which blesses sexual relations outside the bonds of traditional marriage.

The present tactic of those looking for a change is to say that there is a middle way, in which you can reject the development but still remain ‘under the radar’ within the church, holding your point of view but not making a fuss.

Or, perhaps, it is possible to be ‘balanced’ or ‘moderate’ by rejecting same sex marriage, but at the same time to endorsing sexual relationships outside of marriage, commenting on how rich and how pleasing to God they are.

In this way, you can avoid being ‘an extremist’. Of course, ‘extremist’ is such an ugly word that no one wishes to accept the label. We much prefer to have the good judgement that enables us to be in the middle of any dispute, seeing the good on both sides but not turning the argument into a matter of mutually exclusive choice between two options.... the rest

Anglican Unscripted Episode 312


Aug 2, 2017

Split decision from South Carolina Supreme Court in Episcopal Church cases

South Carolina responds to the state supreme court decision

A.S. Haley: South Carolina Decision Is Out
In a divided decision, the trial court's order is reversed as to twenty-nine parishes and affirmed as to the remaining parishes. The trial court's intellectual property ruling is affirmed by a vote of 2-2, with one justice declining to reach the issue.

Here are the seven parishes (and one land trust) which, by a 3-2 vote, were not subject to the Dennis Canon: Christ the King, Waccamaw; St. Matthews Church, Darlington; St. Andrews Church-Mt. Pleasant Land Trust; St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Conway; The Episcopal Church of the Parish of Prince George Winyah, Georgetown; the Parish of St. Andrew, Mt. Pleasant; St. John's Episcopal Church of Florence; and St. Matthias Episcopal Church, Summerton.

Note that the opinions are confusing as to how many "congregations" -- seven or eight -- managed to escape the Dennis Canon, by never acceding in their articles or bylaws to the Constitution and Canons of ECUSA. The reason is that one of the eight is not a congregation, but apparently a trust that holds title to church property...